Landlords have a lot of responsibility when it comes to maintaining the safety of their rented property. Among the newest environmental danger that is causing significant concern to tenants or renters is molds and “toxic molds”, with a number of tenants filing for lawsuits amidst the growing health concerns. Many people don’t really understand the technical and complicated scientific definitions of mold, giving way to a number of misconceptions about toxic molds and its real dangers. Not all molds are a danger to the health, and knowing which ones are is vital in knowing whether your health is in danger and if you have the legal basis for a personal injury claim. Molds are a type of fungus that grows in warm, damp, and humid setting. It can grow inside or outside and they are considered a health risk if there is high concentrations in an area. Any type of molds, regardless of whether toxic or not, if they are in high concentrations can be detrimental to the health. Among the most common “toxic molds” are the Strachybotrys chartarum (S. chartarum) also called the black mold, and the Aspergillis. Having molds in the home does not mean immediate health dangers, but when a mold infestation is determined to be dangerous, the property owner has the responsibility of removing the mold infestation before it becomes a danger to the wellbeing of the tenants. Mold remediation (the removal and clean-up of the mold infestation) is necessary even if the molds are not toxic. Many property owners tend to disregard mold infestations because their clean-up and removal are often expensive and laborious; the area should be thoroughly cleaned to avoid mold spores from being released, otherwise they might simply grow back. If these safety responsibilities are disregarded by the property owner and you as a tenant suffered damages (health or otherwise) due to mold infestation, you have the right to file a personal injury claim against the property owner to recover compensation.


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